[UPHPU] Validation

Brandon Stout hplsbyufan at imapmail.org
Tue Jun 6 00:32:10 MDT 2006


jtaber wrote:
> Tyler Gee wrote:
>   
>>> I have yet to see something you can do with a div that you can't do
>>> with a
>>> table, so I would argue that there is at least as much control with a
>>> table as there is with a div.
>>>       
>> I would tend to agree, but I would rewrite your sentence to be, "I
>> have yet to see something you can do with a table that you can't do
>> with a div, so I would argue that there is at least as much control
>> with a div as there is with a table."
>>
>> And since one is standards-compliant and one is not, I would opt for
>> the standards compliant.
>>
>> And you were neither top- nor bottom-posting. :)
>>
>>     
>
> I'm a big believer in rules of thumb and following the 80/20 pareto
> principal and finding the sweet spots - given that CSS offers advantages
> but browser issues, is there a set of 20% CSS commands that might buy
> 80% of the compatibility benefit - ie. might it be worth using CSS for
> fonts and colors that will be mostly compliant with the browsers while
> knowing that certain alignment commands might require more testing and
> browser work arounds and might be easier to do with tables?   Has there
> been any good comparisons on this ?  My old OReilly Web Design in a
> Nutshell shows what html commands work with the different browsers - is
> there something similar for the CSS commands ?

Here's one I like:

  http://www.w3schools.com/css/css_reference.asp

It lists the W3C standard (CSS version), IE, Firefox, and Netscape.  It
does have a weakness because some CSS features (like the ones I was
using for a list in another thread: margin-left and margin-right) are
supported in IE, but not fully - which is why my list wouldn't center
properly in IE.  I believe margin-left/margin-right works for tables in
IE... There's one for Mac's table layout argument...


Brandon Stout
http://mscis.org


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